A Fingerprint Based Gender Detector System using Fingerprint Pattern Analysis

Faluyi Ibitayo Bamidele, Olowojebutu Olanrewaju Akinyemi, Makinde Oyeladun Bukola

Abstract


Humans have distinctive and unique traits which can be used to distinguish them thus, acting as a form of identification. Biometrics identifies people by measuring some aspect of individual’s anatomy or physiology such as hand geometry or fingerprint which consists of a pattern of interleaved ridges and valleys. The aim of this research is to analyse humans fingerprint texture in order to determine their gender, and correlation of RTVTR and Ridge Count on gender detection. The study is to analyze the effectiveness of physical biometrics (thumbprint) in order to determine gender in humans. Humans have distinctive and unique traits which can be used to distinguish them thus, acting as a form of identification. Biometrics identify people by measuring some aspect of individual’s anatomy or physiology such as hand geometry or fingerprint which consists of a pattern of interleaved ridges and valleys. This work developed a system that determines human gender using fingerprint analysis trained with SVM+CNN (for gender classification). To build an accurate fingerprint based model for gender detection system using fingerprint pattern analysis, there are certain steps that must be taken, which include; Data collection (in conducting research, the first step is collecting data in the form of a set of fingerprint image), Pre-processing Data (before entering the training data, pre-processing data is performed, which is resize the fingerprint image 96x96 pixels). Training Data (in this processing the dataset will be trained using the Convolutional neural network and Support vector machine methodology. This training data processing is a stage where CNN + SVM are trained to obtained high accuracy from the classification conducted). Result Verification (after doing all the above process, at this stage, we will display the results of gender prediction based on fingerprint images in the application that has been making). SOCOFing database is made up of 6,000 fingerprint images from 600 African subjects. It contains unique attributes such as labels for gender, hand and finger name as well as synthetically altered versions with three different levels of alteration for obliteration, central rotation, and z-cut. The values for accuracy, sensitivity and precision using the CNN classifier at threshold 0.25 were 96%, 97.8% and 96.92% respectively. At threshold 0.45 the values were 96.3%, 97.6% and 97.6% respectively. At threshold 0.75 the values were 96.5%, 97.3% and 97.9% respectively. In case of the SVM classifier, at threshold 0.25 were 94.3%, 96.6% and 95.8% respectively. At threshold 0.45 the values were 94.5%, 96.4% and 96.2% respectively. At threshold 0.75 the values were 94.8%, 97.3% and 96.8% respectively. From the 600 fingerprints classified, it was observed that a total of 450 fingerprints were detected for male and 150 for female. Results were obtained for gender accuracy, sensitivity and precision through several thresholds to compare the two classifiers. However, it should be verified that the results obtained showed that the CNN classification yielded better accuracy, sensitivity and precision than SVM.


Full Text:

PDF


DOI: https://doi.org/10.26483/ijarcs.v13i4.6885

Refbacks

  • There are currently no refbacks.




Copyright (c) 2022 International Journal of Advanced Research in Computer Science